Free MOT Check

Enter your vehicle registration to find out its current MOT status – for FREE

Check the past results

Enter your vehicle registration to find out its current MOT status – for FREE

Check my MOT status

GB

What is an MOT?

An MOT is a series of tests to ensure your car is roadworthy and meets UK standards. A vehicle should have an MOT check every 12 months. The only exception is if it is brand new – in this case, the vehicle won’t need an MOT test for the first 3 years.

Testimonial

It was a great experience, we were very happy with the service from the BigWantsYourCar.com team.

Sally Edwards

Ford Mondeo
Testimonial

I’d never thought about using a service like BigWantsYourCar.com before, but I have part-exchanged in the past and always felt short-changed. Having the cash to put down as a deposit helped me get a better finance deal on my new car. Thanks, BigWantsYourCar.com!

Steve Richardson

Ford Focus
Testimonial

BigWantsYourCar.com made selling my car so easy. They were very professional and took care of everything, and I got paid the same as the quote.

Stewart Macauley

BMW 3 Series
Previous
Next

MOT History

Before buying any car or vehicle you should carry out an MOT history check. Think of the MOT history check as a diary of the car’s lifespan; it’ll be able to tell you everything that’s happened to the car since it rolled off the production line. You’ll be able to find out if there are any recurring mechanical or electrical issues, whether the previous owner(s) kept it to a high standard, when the last MOT check was carried out, and whether it is currently legally roadworthy.

Frequently Asked Questions

To do an MOT check all you need are two things; five minutes of time and the vehicle’s registration number to enter above. This won’t cost you a penny to do – it’s totally free.

Umm, yes and no. If your current MOT certificate hasn’t expired then your vehicle is still technically roadworthy – that’s as long as no major faults are found on the new MOT test. If major faults are found on the new test and you don’t get them fixed before your old certificate expires, then you run the risk of a new certificate not being issued and your car would not then be legal to drive on the road.

Advisory issues that are named on MOT certificates mean that the MOT tester has found some minor faults with your vehicle but they are not serious enough to warrant rendering the car unroadworthy. These are usually things like a brake light bulb needing to be replaced or a warning that your tyre(s) will need replacing soon.

Just enter your registration number in the box above. This will tell you when the last MOT test was carried out and you can do an MOT history check at the same time. Remember, your vehicle will need to have an MOT test every 12 months once it reaches 3 years old.

If you drive a car without a valid MOT certificate then you could face 3 penalty points on your licence and a fine of up to £2,500. You could even potentially be banned from driving altogether. That’s why it’s essential that your DVLA MOT check is up-to-date.

Yes, you can, but only if you are on the way to an MOT test appointment or an MOT retest appointment to prove that you have had all the issues fixed to make it roadworthy that were identified in a previous recent MOT test.

If the MOT test was completed less than 28 days ago, you can ask the test centre to re-check the mileage and they will be able to rectify the issue and issue a new MOT certificate. If the MOT test was more than 28 days ago, you’ll need to report the mistake to the DVLA and they will sort this out.

If your vehicle is over 40 years old then it won’t require an MOT (although, you are expected to still keep it in a roadworthy condition). Other exemptions include:

  • If the vehicle is under 3 years old
  • Electric vehicles registered before March 2015
  • Classic Vehicles

There are a number of things that you should look for when checking and MOT:

  • The MOT certificate expiry date
  • The date of the MOT test
  • The overall results of the MOT test
  • The mileage of the vehicle at the time of testing
  • Any advisory notices
  • The reasons for refusal to grant an MOT certificate

Check my MOT status

Enter your vehicle registration to find out its current
MOT status – for FREE

GB